Load of Hay

Load of Hay

Making hay the hard way on the 6-7 acre field behind the LH Rivard house in TL.    Note the dump rake used to bunch the hay, which was then pitched onto the wagon (or truck) by men using pitch forks.  This load may have been off-loaded into the small barn on the property as winter feed for the 3-4 cows kept there by L.H. Rivard.  The Rivard boys milked the cows, separated the milk, and then delivered milk and cream via hand pull wagons to customers in TL.  This provided a supplemental income for Alma during the lean years of the 1930’s, and taught the Rivard boys responsibility and work ethic.  It’s not clear if this was still happening in 1939.  I think not because the Rivard boys were otherwise occupied.   In that case, this load of hay may have been bound via truck to one of LH’s farm properties, maybe even the Horseshoe Lake farm (although the new barn there wasn’t completed until ~1940.)  The truck was likely Erv Smith’s “dray line” being operated by Raymond Rivard.  There is a pretty good chance that the two men on the truck are Richard and Raymond.  What do you think?   

In the late 40’s and 50’s, Raymond continued to raise hay and corn on this field, and used the dray line trucks to haul the crop three miles via the Canyon road to the Horseshoe Lake farm.  Ray’s 1949 purchase of a Ford tractor with “road gear” made it no longer necessary to use trucks for hauling the hay.  Also, hay baling replaced loose hay.

Sometime in the 20’s or 30’s, LH was the first in the area to introduce the superior mix of alfalfa and brome grass, replacing clover as the hay of choice, over a period of years.  LH was in many businesses, and he did them all well, including following the advice coming out of the University of Wisconsin via the county field agents, whose job it was to help farmers learn their living to earn their living.  John   

St. Anne’s Church

St. Anne’s Church

Possibly the St. Ann’s church in TL, during construction, circa 1940, as viewed from the “back” of the church in the general area of the old “Richardson” house, then or later occupied by your grandmother and step-grandfather and perhaps where your mother was raised?   Raymond hauled lumber to the church construction site while operating the “dray line” owned by Ervin Smith. 

The lower photo is another view of the church.  There are four young children in the foreground lower right, looking very much like your cousins Jeanne & Mark Smith and Rosemary & John Rivard, but perhaps about 1943 based on size (if that is us in the photo).  JLR

 

John Theophile Rivard

John Theophile Rivard

Rev. John T. Rivard was a nice looking young man and was iconic to all his young nieces and nephews.  He was exuberant, irrepressible, joyful, and funny.  His presence and aura filled the room.

JLR

Louis Laurin

Louis Laurin

Louis Lauren 2

Louis Laurin was an exact opposite [of his brother John].  Distant, reserved, even haughty.  We knew him little because he was personally and geographically distant.  He enlisted about 1939, worked up through the ranks [Air Force] during the war years, and retired as a Lt. Colonel. JLR

Louis Laurin was the son of Alma DuBois and her first husband, Louis Laurin. His sister was Louise, and they lived in Cumberland, Wisconsin. Louis Laurin died young, and Alma later married Louis H. Rivard. Alma and Louis H had three sons, John, Raymond and Richard.

I remember Louie Laurin as a small girl. In college years on a trip to South America with my present day husband we stopped in Miami and stayed with Louie and his wife. They had two toy poodle dogs and a very secure home protection system. Louie was hospitable, not exuberant in his manner but graciously took us around Miami and showed us the highlights, like Coconut Grove. GRB

Ona Dunneman & Martha Nihart

Ona Dunneman & Martha Nihart

The foursome is definitely teachers, because I recognize Martha Nihart and Ona Dunneman, both of whom were friends of Annabelle.  Martha never married, and was my English teacher in high school 1952-56.  I have an early memory of Rose and I being upstairs in Alma’s house with Martha in her room, where she took a picture of us with her new camera.  Probably circa 1943.   Ona married, stayed local, and remained an acquaintance of Annabelle. JLR

In Front of the Alma and LH Rivard Home

In Front of the Alma and LH Rivard Home

The home of LH and Alma Rivard in TL.  During the hard times of the 30’s and into the 40’s, Alma rented two upstairs bedrooms to teachers to supplement the family income.   Annabelle Berg Rivard rented there.  I suspect the top photo is Alma with two teachers. John L Rivard

Who could the tall distinguished woman in the center have been? Was she a teacher? What did she teach?

Views of the Home of LH and Alma Rivard

Views of the Home of LH and Alma Rivard

The house in all the photos is the house of LH and Alma Rivard, their second house.  It was across the street from St. Ann’s church, with three lots facing the street, and 11 acres stretching out behind.  It had a large garden area out back, separate barn for about 3-4 cows, a chicken coop, and a large apple orchard further back with about 8 very productive trees of different varieties.  The lots on either side were vacant, until LH built the new house about 1952 on the lot to the right, after his lakeshore property development “Rivard Park” near Lake Wapogasset (Amery) had put him back on a solid financial footing (he sold out the 53 platted lakeshore lots). 

All five children of Alma Laurin Rivard lived in this house, and became young adults in this house, but Raymond remembered living in their house next to the blacksmith shop, so none was born in this house. JLR

 

Do you know this dog?

Do you know this dog?

“The dog is Fitzi, beloved pet of the LH and Alma Rivard family, especially Louise. It’s very likely that the dog was never a favorite of the exceptionally clean housekeeper Alma. But Fitzi had acquired legendary status by the time the children of Louise and Raymond heard the stories.” JLR

What’s the point?

What’s the point?

We think the point is to pass the test or overcome the problem, but the truth is that things don’t really get solved. They come together and they fall apart. Then they come together again and fall apart again. It’s just like that. The healing comes from letting there be room for all of this to happen: room for grief, for relief, for joy.

Pema Chödrön